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Year : 2013  |  Volume : 4  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 166-167  

C-section, formula may disrupt 'good' gut bacteria in babies


Department of Pharmacology, Indira Gandhi Medical College and Research Institute, Kadhirkamam, Puducherry, India

Date of Web Publication20-Apr-2013

Correspondence Address:
G Sivagnanam
Department of Pharmacology, Indira Gandhi Medical College and Research Institute, Kadhirkamam, Puducherry
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


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How to cite this article:
Sivagnanam G. C-section, formula may disrupt 'good' gut bacteria in babies. J Pharmacol Pharmacother 2013;4:166-7

How to cite this URL:
Sivagnanam G. C-section, formula may disrupt 'good' gut bacteria in babies. J Pharmacol Pharmacother [serial online] 2013 [cited 2019 Jul 23];4:166-7. Available from: http://www.jpharmacol.com/text.asp?2013/4/2/166/110924


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Being born by cesarean section or babies who were exclusively or even partially formula-fed has been tied to higher risks for various health problems in children, and now a new study finds these babies also have fewer "good" bacteria in their digestive tract. [1]


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There is increasing concern over rising rates of cesarean delivery and insufficient exclusive breastfeeding of infants in developed countries. In a study carried out in Canada, it has been found that formula-fed infants had increased richness of species, with over representation of Clostridium difficile compared to breast-fed ones. Escherichia, Shigella, and Bacteroides species were underrepresented in infants born by cesarean delivery. These findings provide new evidence for the effects of delivery mode and infant diet as determinants of this essential microbial community in early life. [2]

It is also hypothesised that a distortion in normal microbiota composition, is associated with late onset sepsis in preterm infants. [3]

A disturbed microbiota during early infancy has been linked to the risk of developing infectious, inflammatory and allergic diseases later in life. Thus, it has been suggested that, incorporating specific probiotics for the development of the infant's gut microbiota may form a beneficial possibility for future infant feeding purposes. [4]

Early intestinal colonization with Lactobacilli and Bifidobacteria support the concept of their ability to modify the gut microbiota with beneficial roles like reduction in the risk of cancer due to their capacity to decrease β-glucoronidase and carcinogen levels. Thus, these agents (referred to as "probiotics") are being tried to be employed in modern nutrition habits (with so-called functional foods). Since they are normal residents of the microbiota in humans, whether such gut derived probiotic should be commercially employed is a matter of debate. [5]

 
   References Top

1.Available from: http://www.medicinenet.com/script/main/art.asp?articlekey= 167725. [Last accessed 2013 Feb 18].  Back to cited text no. 1
    
2.Azad MB, Konya T, Maughan H, Guttman DS, Field CJ, Chari RS, et al. Gut microbiota of healthy Canadian infants: Profiles by mode of delivery and infant diet at 4 months. CMAJ 2013 [Epub ahead of print].  Back to cited text no. 2
    
3.Mai V, Torrazza RM, Ukhanova M, Wang X, Sun Y, Li N, et al. Distortions in development of intestinal microbiota associated with late onset sepsis in preterm infants. PLoS One 2013;8:e52876.  Back to cited text no. 3
    
4.Salminen S, Isolauri E. Opportunities for improving the health and nutrition of the human infant by probiotics. Nestle Nutr Workshop Ser Pediatr Program 2008;62:223-33.  Back to cited text no. 4
    
5.Bezirtzoglou E, Stavropoulou E. Immunology and probiotic impact of the newborn and young children intestinal microflora. Anaerobe 2011;17:369-74.  Back to cited text no. 5
    




 

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